Spring Week 9: Plastic Bag Jellyfish

What have you made?

How does it relate to your previous/subsequent work?

Why did you make it?

What message does it send?

How does it communicate ideas?

Does it have a goal or purpose?

Does it tell a story?

How did you make it?

What materials did you use?

What processes did it involve?

What inspired you?

What artists?

What ideas?

What issues?

What media?

How effective is it?

Did it turn out the way you wanted?

What works?

What doesn’t work?

What feedback did you get?

Does the feedback align with what you thought?

What’s the next step?

How can this artwork be improved?

Are you going to stick with it or move on?

What would you do differently about it?

How will it inspire your future work?

Have you learned anything from it?

As a continuation of my environmental focus – the fact that sea turtles eat plastic bags thinking they’re jellyfish – I began making jellyfish out of plastic bags in week 9.

I did this for many reasons, including:

Irony – the plastic bags are being made to look like the very thing they are mistaken for.

Statement – by making plastic bags look like jellyfish, it emphasises how similar they look underwater and therefore how potentially deadly plastic bags are.

Impact – through my feedback it became clear that when there is more labour put into my work, it shows and the work is more effective. The jellyfish are delicate and intricate, which should hopefully increase the impact of my work.

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The starting point – a single, clear, co-op plastic bag.
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Cutting the bag in half revealed to me how much material I had to work with – roughly about 2 square feet.
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I cut a circle of about 11″ diameter out of the plastic, and by folding up the edges and holding the folds in place with superglue, I made a dome shape to represent the jellyfish’s head.
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Close-up view of one of the folds
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The finished dome.

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